A Breamish Valley Welcome

We have been lucky with the weather this summer for our outings into Northumberland. Many of our participants cannot afford the walking and hiking gear; the sturdy boots, waterproofs etc. So we’ve been sharing and borrowing and sometimes buying stuff that ‘s needed to make sure our bodies and especially our feet are comfortable as we journey out of our urban settings, out of our comfort zones into the Great Outdoors. It’s been a collective learning curve as well as a whole heap of enjoyment and laughter.

Our trip out to Breamish Valley didn’t disappoint even if the going was a little bit tougher than we’re used to.

Again we met with Chris Jones, Historic Environment Officer of Northumberland National Park Authority, at Bulby’s Woods carpark. From here we had to walk along a single track road until we came to rough stoned footpath leading off to the right and up.


On this visit, we had mothers with pushchairs with babies and toddlers. There was only so far they could go on this path. Some women stayed behind watching babies and pushchairs while other women strived on up the rough path. The path went on and on. Some mothers were called back as babies were unsettled. Other women enjoyed their freedom and strode on up and up the hill.
We stopped at Turf Knowe Burial Cairn to look back over the course we’d walked and across the valley, Ingram or Breamish Valley. Seeing the important River Breamish flowing by the southern side of The Cheviots, becoming the River Till near Wooler. This is the only tributary of the River Tweed that flows in England, exclusively. An ancient landscape which is a long walk for small legs, said a 3 year old.


This area is an archaeologists dream offering rich discoveries of our ancestors. At Turf Knowe archaeologists discovered two Bronze Age burial cains probably dating back 4000 years. It was a priveledge to be able to stand here and take it all in, past and present.

On our descent, we walked on into Ingram village to meet up in the cafe with the mothers and children who couldn’t make the climb. We were catered for very warmly here and enjoyed a rest in the sun. But before we got back on the coach to leave the Valley, we had to get our feet wet in the river.

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